Open Research Studies at the Penn Memory Center

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Eventually, everyone experiences some degree of age-related changes in memory and thinking. How does personal awareness of these changes relate to overall quality of life?

Those with normal memory and thinking, MCI, or early to moderate AD may be eligible. Requires two 60-90 minute interviews, conducted several weeks apart; repeated one year later.

Download a one-page overview of this study including contact information

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This is a Phase II study that examines the cognitive effects of the diabetes drug Metformin on non-diabetic individuals.

Those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or early Alzheimer’s disease may be eligible. The study consists of one baseline visit, five in-clinic visits (one per month for five consecutive months), and twelve weekly phone calls.

Download a one-page overview of the study including contact information

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The Merck BACE 1 study is a Phase II study testing the safety, tolerability, and cognitive effects of the Merck BACE inhibitor drug.

Individuals 55-85 years of age with a diagnosis of mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease may be eligible. The study includes one baseline visit, 10 in-clinic visits, and 7 phone calls.

Download a one-page overview of the study including contact information

Welcome to Penn Memory Center

National Memory Screening Day

The Penn Memory Center is a participating site for the National Memory Screening Day, sponsored by the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America. National Memory Screening Day is Tuesday, November 19, 2013.
National Memory Screening Day is an initiative to promote early detection and intervention for those concerned about memory loss as well as to educate the public about successful aging.

People who visit our booth will receive:

  • Free, confidential memory screenings
  • The opportunity to be followed up with an exam by a physician or other qualified healthcare professional for an accurate diagnosis, treatment, social services and community resources, if they meet the Penn Memory Center eligibility criteria
  • Information and educational materials about Alzheimer’s disease and successful aging
  • Information about research opportunities at the Penn Memory Center
  • Information about the Penn Memory Center’s Cognitive Fitness Program

Free memory screenings will take place on Tuesday, November 19, 2013 from 10:00 am – 4:00 pm in the lobby of the Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine, 3400 Civic Center Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104.

For more information about National Memory Screening Day, please visit: http://nationalmemoryscreening.org/index.php

For questions about screenings at the Penn Memory Center, please call Tigist Hailu at 215-573-6095 or tigist.hailu@uphs.upenn.edu.


Do you have a passion, talent, or skill that you would like to share with others?

Research tells us that cognitive stimulation and social engagement are key components to successful aging. The Penn Memory Center is pleased to provide a platform for our patients and community to come together and learn from one another. If you would like to volunteer to lead a book club or a discussion group, teach knitting, lead a yoga class, or share another skill with others at the Penn Memory Center, we are happy to host, promote and provide some administrative assistance to transform your interest into action.

Interested volunteers should contact Felicia Greenfield at 215-614-1828 or felicia.greenfield@uphs.upenn.edu.



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